Dancing with the Zapatistas

Dancing with the Zapatistas

Dancing with the Zapatistas is a collection of scholarly and artistic responses to the continuing work and lives of the Zapatistas twenty years after their emergence from the Lacondon Jungle.  The digital book illustrates the many ways the Zapatistas have inspired other movements and artistic responses. Written by scholars, artists, journalists, activists and graduate students, each response is informed and enriched by the others yet also comprehensible in its own right.

Besides co-editing the book, I also contributed a photo-essay of the murals of Oventik. 

2014 – My Year in Review

120 migraines that I photographed (I know I didn’t photograph them all)

Medication costs – $19, 353. (only $127. was non-migraine related)
I paid $860. (I would have no life without good health insurance.)

2014 migraines

I started photographing myself every time I have a migraine in May 2009 as a way to keep track of how  many migraines I had. I used to count the number between doctor visits, but this was the first time I actually counted how many I had in a year. I am sure that I was afraid to see the enormity, which, not surprisingly, is staggering. 100migraines.net draws from these 5.5 years of photos, and now I know that it contains less than a year’s worth

more migraine posts

Malcolm X’s Passionate Engagement With Photography – NYTimes.com

great piece by Maurice Berger in the lens blog today
Malcolm X’s Passionate Engagement With Photography

Malcolm X often carried a camera, his way of “collecting evidence,” as Gordon Parks once observed. He relied on photographs to provide the visual proof of Black Muslim productivity and equanimity that sensationalistic headlines and verbal reporting often negated.

 

Watching Thugs With Razors and Clubs at Tahrir Sq. – NYTimes.com

from Nicholas Kristof in Cairo

Watching Thugs With Razors and Clubs at Tahrir Sq. – NYTimes.com.

Pro-government thugs at Tahrir Square used clubs, machetes, swords and straight razors on Wednesday to try to crush Egypt’s democracy movement, but, for me, the most memorable moment of a sickening day was one of inspiration: watching two women stand up to a mob.

EGYPT – conflict, anger, unrest, protest, on the Edge

Can’t stop watching/listening to Al Jazeera Live Stream from Egypt. The revolution will not be televised, but it is being streamed and tweeted at least to those of us outside Egypt. I read the paper for perspective and putting everything together from the day before.

Live updates from the Guardian

Aljazeera has its Anger in Egypt page with its own logo. And great collection of photos.

BBC calls it Egypt Unrest day #
ABC is the only network news as if today has a logo online for the conflict

The New York Times hasn’t named its coverage but the Lede Blog is even active on a Sunday.
MSNBC surprised me with how through and well organized its coverage is – link
At the Huffington Post, it is Egypt on Edge

And this article I was led to from a link from Facebook: The “Women Of The Egyptian Revolution” Compilation Being Made by Leil-Zahra Mortada.(Dialup Warning) – Democratic Underground.
The photo above when see on the Democratic Underground collection , the women stood out immediately. As the front image on today’s New York Times Week in Review, I was so struck by the action in the photo, the woman as the centerpiece only became apparent after prolonged viewing.

Collection of tweets on Huffington Post