Tag Archives: feminist

Art in the 1980s: The Forgotten History of PAD/D

Art in the 1980s: The Forgotten History of PAD/D

Art in the 1980s: The Forgotten History of PAD/D

Great piece in Hyperallergic about the PAD/D (Political Art Documentation and Distribution) collective and its archive which is now at MoMA library in Queens.

A lot of this was happening when I first moved to NYC. In retrospect, I don’t understand why I didn’t get involved.

I love the last line of the article in how it speaks about why we make archives:  “The archive is in a place that will forever be there, and perhaps no one will show it much attention. But maybe one day, someone will see it, and will.” [by artist Mimi Smith.]

And there is a second essay
 with many great selections
from the archive.

Alina Szapocznikow

Can’t Stop thinking about work . This exhibition along with Sanja Ivekovic has been the highlights of my art going this year.

MoMA | Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955–1972.

More links:

Bio from Polish Cultural Institute

Alina Szapocznikow archive at Museum of Modern Art in Archive

Even thought their work is very different than mine, both Sanja and Alina’s work have more parallels to my interest than most artists whose work I can think of.

  < ^ :  links to projects in the archive

Yvonne Rainer inspires me

Yvonne Rainer‘s first film, Hand Movie, was shot by fellow dancer William Davis when Rainer was confined to a hospital bed, recovering from major surgery and unable to dance. The resulting five minutes of footage is a sustained close-up shot of Rainer’s hand against a grey background as it stretches and contracts, bends and points, performing the kinds of everyday, quotidian movements that characterize her pioneering minimalist choreography. watch on ubweb.

Links, Links, Links

Museu d’Art Contemorani de Barcelona publication and exhbition links

Videos

William Pope L., How Much is that Nigger in the Window
Franklin Furnace 1991

CECUT Project 
Krzysztof Wodiczko, Adam Whiton, Sung Ho Kim

The purpose was to use progressive technology to give voice and visibility to the women who work in the “maquiladora” industry in Tijuana. We designed a headset that integrated a camera and a microphone allowing the wearer to move while keeping the transmitted image in focus. The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live.  read more